From Coast-to-Coast-to-Coast

Category: Culture (Page 1 of 4)

A Universal Basic Income is again being considered by the Canadian government

Vice »

The Senate’s national finance committee will study a bill on October 17 which would create a national framework for—but not actually implement—UBI, according to a press release from the office of Ontario Senator Kim Pate. An identical bill exists in the House of Commons and is sponsored by Member of Parliament Leah Gazan.

The bill in the Senate, which received a first and second reading in 2021 and last April, respectively, would require provincial ministers and Indigenous governing bodies across the country to convene and determine how a UBI plan could work. This would include ensuring that “participation in education, training or the labour market” is not required to receive UBI, and that funding for other social services are not cut. If the bill passes both the Senate and House of Commons, a report would have to be made public a year after the study begins.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau revealed that other countries are quietly supporting Canada’s Online News Act

CBC » Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says other countries are ‘watching very closely’ as Canada’s dispute with Meta over the Online News Act continues.

PM Trudeau revealed that other countries are quietly supporting Canada’s Online News Act, Bill C-18, which passed the House of Commons in June. The legislation mandates that tech giants Google and Meta pay Canadian media outlets for news content shared or repurposed on their platforms.

The Black population is diverse and growing » 1.5 million people in Canada reported being Black

“In 2021,1.5 million people in Canada reported being Black, up from 1.2 million five years earlier, and more than 300 different ethnic or cultural origins were reported in the Census of Population,” according to Statistics Canada. “While the education and labour market experiences of Black people in Canada are just as diverse as the Black population, the socioeconomic conditions of this population, including rates of employment and earnings, are generally lower than the non-Indigenous, non-racialized population. This is true even after accounting for differences in age and education.”

Forty-one percent of Canadian professionals plan to change jobs by end of year

Robert Half »

Those most likely to make a career move now and in the remaining months of 2023 are:

  • Gen Zers (64 per cent)
  • Marketing and creative professionals (51 per cent)
  • Working parents (51 per cent)
  • Employees who have been with their company for 2-4 years (56 per cent)
  • Contract work is a viable route for many professionals, with 31 per cent of workers saying they are interested in contract roles in the future.

Workers exploring other employment opportunities are motivated by:

  • A higher salary (55 per cent)
  • Better benefits and perks (28 per cent)
  • Remote work options (26 per cent)

Compensation, benefits, flexible schedules and remote work options are also the top factors professionals look for when evaluating job postings.

When applying for an open role, professionals said they’d lose interest and withdraw from consideration due to:

  • Poor communication and follow-up from the hiring manager (56 per cent)
  • Excessive — or more than three — rounds of interviews (46 per cent)
  • Delayed decision-making/lengthy timeline (38 per cent)

Also » Consulting.ca

 

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